Joan identifies with the movies

 Posted by on April 25, 2009 at 10:52 am  Characters
Apr 252009
 

It’s just a touch more cross-season character stuff; Joan finds herself in the movies.

In Long Weekend, she is angry with Roger because she identifies with Shirley Maclaine in The Apartment. Later that episode, she says she needs to stop being Doris Day and become Kim Novak.

Shirley Maclaine and Jack Lemmon in the elevator, The Apartment

Shirley Maclaine and Jack Lemmon in the elevator, The Apartment

In Six Month Leave, Joan is again fully identified with an actress, this time, Marilyn Monroe. Although all the women are upset, it’s Joan who has to lie down. And once again, as in Long Weekend, she’s offended that Roger doesn’t get it.

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  15 Responses to “Joan identifies with the movies”

  1. Just wanted to say I’m loving all the tidbits every day. I did not remember Joan mentioning Doris Day and Kim Novak. I’ll have to rewatch that episode.

    By the way, I don’t know if you can control the ads on here, but today is the second time some malicious ad has tried to attack my computer on here and redirect me. Good thing I have my protective programs. Stay safe everyone.

    • Doris Day and Kim Novak: It’s in the scene where Carol & Joan are getting ready to go out. It’s all over YouTube and we’ve linked it here.

  2. Moreover, in “Long Weekend,” Joan plays elevator operator (a la Shirley Maclaine) for Cooper as he advises her not to waste youth on age. As the doors close, you can see that the parallel is not lost on Joan, either.

  3. Joan and Don should go to the movies together!

  4. @Karl,

    Good observation.

  5. Karl, I noticed that as well.

    saber, I can change ads or contact the advertising service. Please send details as to which ad and what happened if this ever happens again.

  6. hey, just like to inform everyone that Mad Men WON the BAFTA for best international

  7. God, I hate The Apartment. Maybe it’s just that the world has moved on, I don’t know; I just find it to be grating and the dialog unrealistic.

    • It’s our mother’s favorite movie.

      I didn’t like it the first time I saw it; it’s worth giving it a second chance. The world has only moved on in the sense of catch phrases and slang; Billy Wilder’s dialogue is absolutely killer.

  8. “Moreover, in “Long Weekend,” Joan plays elevator operator (a la Shirley Maclaine) for Cooper as he advises her not to waste youth on age. As the doors close, you can see that the parallel is not lost on Joan, either.”

    I was totally gonna say that! I think it drove home the irony of Roger telling her that “It’s not like that here.”

  9. What stayed with me about Joan’s grief over Marilyn: the other women mourned together. She grieved in private.

    Why? What does she feel is separate: her grief from theirs, or she from the other women? What is the quality of that difference?

    When did she become so alone?

    • Great question, Anne.

    • It’s a great observation, but I don’t think it’s a change from S1. Joan is always alone; separate from the other women. She speaks at them, not with them. Joan moves about as though she is in her own movie.

  10. Joan is the office manager. I think she maintains a distance to preserve her status.

    • Yes, but I think the distance comes naturally to her. In fact, it may be the characteristic that made her a good leader/manager.

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